Queensferry? What’s in a Name?

Stone with signs telling story of The Binks natural jetty and St Margaret Queen of Scotland. Behind is the sea and Forth Bridge.

Looking south towards three magnificent bridges, consider the names of the villages on either side of the water. North Queensferry and South Queensferry. Ever wondered where the names come from? A bit easier than arguments surrounding the origin of the name Dunfermline as these are quite literal. 

Stone with signs telling story of The Binks natural jetty and St Margaret Queen of Scotland. Behind is the sea and Forth Bridge.
South Queensferry signs about St Margaret’s ferry crossing.

Queen Margaret introduced a ferry crossing over the Forth between these two points and offered it free to pilgrims as they travelled north through Fife to visit the relics of St Andrew. Thus, the Queen’s ferry became Queensferry.

The latest bridge with its three impressive cable-tied towers opened in 2017 and carries the name Queensferry Crossing. Other recent residents in Rosyth Dockyard continue the royal connections of the Firth: the Royal Navy’s two new aircraft carriers, Queen Elizabeth II and Prince of Wales, were constructed there, each one costing twice as much as the bridge! 

Do you use Snapchat? We have a wee treat using the back of a Bank of Scotland £20 note with the Forth Bridge. Capture the Snaplense to use on your money or the image at Stop 11 to see the Queensferry story come to life.

Snapchat filter lense trigger called Queensferry X-ing by Graeme Sutherland
Queensferry Crossing Snapchat Lense

We hope you enjoyed discovering Dunfermline’s royal connections. Hear of our other free tours, click the triangle below for details.

We’d love to hear your feedback too – you can find us @GoDunfermline on Facebook and Twitter, or share your comments with #GoDunfermline.

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